Podcasts

The Week Unwrapped: Headers, savings and costly chips

Arion McNicoll and The Week delve behind the headlines and debate what really matters from the past seven days.

You can subscribe to The Week Unwrapped wherever you get your podcasts:

  • Spotify 
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In this week’s episode, we discuss:

Heading out

The English Football Association has announced that under-12s will be banned from heading the ball in the games it supervises from the start of next season, in response to concern that the impact of repeated headers can lead to an increased risk of dementia. Initially a one-year trial, the plan is likely to become a permanent change in the rules for under-12s from the following season – and is likely to ignite a debate about the future of heading in older age groups too.

Savings get interesting

In a rare piece of positive personal finance news, interest rates for savers have been increasing after several years in the doldrums. Those gains for savours are the silver lining attached to the very large dark cloud of rising inflation. What should we all be doing to maximise the benefits of a more competitive rate – and could it help Britain to develop a better savings habit?

The price of chips

The UK’s recent heatwave, which has followed a period of exceptionally dry weather, has led to fears that this year’s potato harvest will be much smaller than usual, leading to shortages and a rise in prices. Fish and chip shops are likely to be hit particularly hard, given that fish and cooking oil prices have also risen sharply after supplies of both were disrupted by the war in Ukraine. Is there any good news for farmers (and shoppers) – and what is the longer-term outlook for British agriculture?

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